Kombucha Mustard

fermented mustard-2

I’ve finally started to develop a taste for mustard although it’s taken me some decades to get there.  The nasty neon yellow Plochman’s mustard of my childhood didn’t work well on my palate, especially after a disagreeably formative experience with a hotdog at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago.

I had bought an overload of mustard seeds in preparation for my Lime Pickle experiment (which is one of my absolute favorites on this site, BTW) and now that I’m avidly fermenting, I thought I’d give making my own mustard a shot.   I tried a side by side experiment with one being a success and the other what I would consider a failure.  The successful one by far is the Kombucha fermented mustard.  The failure was a cardamom mustard which I fermented with sauerkraut juice.  The cardamom mustard simply ended up too bitter and distasteful, even after adding a bunch of sugar to try to balance it.  It ended up in the compost bin.

The good one was Kombucha Mustard.  Yum.  Its very simple to make and it comes out flavorful and much more enjoyable. It can still be somewhat intense depending on how hot your mustard seeds are.  Here’s the way I made it:

Preparation Time: 5 minutes
Fermentation time: 1-3 weeks (mine was 10 days)
Yield: 3 cups

Ingredients:

1+1/2 c yellow mustard seeds
2 cups kombucha
1 tsp salt

Directions:

  1. Place mustard seeds in a jar and fermented mustard-1pour in kombucha
  2. mix well.  Give the seeds a chance to settle in as they will tend to float initially
  3. Cover with a cloth or coffee filter
  4. Wait 1-3 weeks.  I waited 10 days
  5. place in a food processor or blender with thfermented mustard-3e salt and blend until it reaches a desired consistency.  I chose somewhere shy of puree to retain some of the texture of the mustard seeds.
  6. Jar it up and place in a refrigerator.

My first tasting with this mustard was on an almond butter, avocado, sauerkraut sandwich and it was delicious.  While flavorful, it didn’t dominate.  Love it with veggie sausages too.  Gotta get some pretzels and dip ‘em in – my other favorite mustard foray.    Enjoy.


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fermenTed

fermenTed

Developer / Chef at Fermentation Recipes
I've been fermenting various foods for the past few years and constantly have at least a few different ferments and experiments going at the same time. I love not only the taste of fermented foods, but also the science as well. I live on the coast of northern California but am often traveling further afield. I also love photography play piano and guitar, play around with website development and enjoy woodworking.
fermenTed
fermenTed

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Comments

Kombucha Mustard — 6 Comments

  1. Hi Ted,
    Love your web site, Nuferm has been a wholefood fermenting company for 8 years in Australia and 6 in Scotland. We are branching out to run some retreats as Fermenting foods is really taking off in Australia, especially in Nth Queensland. Your recipes are really inspiring and so easy to follow with your clean web site. We have Clive Lawler visiting today who is going t teach us all about Fermented Bread. So kinder on your tummy. Love fermented foods so healthy, so age reversing. Thanks Ted

  2. Hi Ted:

    Thanks for your website. I have used many of the recipes on your site (and variations thereof) and they are all great. I wanted to share something with you I hope you enjoy. I didn’t know where to send it so I hope here is ok. Have a great day!!

    Adam’s Fermented International Chimichurri Sauce

    I love the cuisines of Thailand (Thai basil), South American countries (cilantro and parsley), and middle eastern countries (parsley) and noticed they all had a version of chimichurri. I combined all three and then fermented it for a wonderful tasting and healthy condiment that keeps for months in your fridge. I hope you like it.

    Ingredients:
    2 bunches organic flat leaf parsley (the top part with the bottom section of the stems removed)
    2 bunches organic cilantro (the top part with the bottom section of the stems removed)
    3 bunches of thai basil (just the leaves; no stems)
    2 bunches of organic scallions
    8 cloves of garlic (or to taste)
    juice of 6 limes
    1 teaspoon of white pepper
    1 teaspoon of fermented hot sauce (or tabasco, crystal, or your favorite brand). A recipe for fermented hot sauce i have used (actually variations thereof) can be found at http://nourishedkitchen.com/fermented-hot-chili-sauce-recipe/)
    1 Tablespoon of fermented sauerkraut brine
    1 Tablespoon salt (I used himalayan pink salt)
    A small amount of 3% brine (just enough to cover the top after bottling)

    Directions:
    Roughly chop all the greens and all all the ingredients (not including the brine) in a food processor and finely chop.

    1. Wash the greens.
    2. Roughly chop all the greens and put all the ingredients (not including the brine) in a food processor and pulse until everything is finely chopped and well combined.
    3. Place the mixture into a mason jar (I equip mine with an air lock) and pack the mixture in tightly. Make sure you don’t fill the jar too full.
    4. Once the chimichurri is packed in tightly, gently pour 2-3 tablespoons of your brine (I used 19 grams of sea salt to 1 quart of water) over the top of the pesto. You just want enough to cover with a nice layer of brine.
    5. Add your airlock, close the lid, and let ferment in a dark place for 3-4 days and then move to cold storage.
    7. I have also used it like a pesto by adding grated parmesan cheese and olive oil to it.

    You can use it with with grilled chicken or steak, of course, but I also use it to flavor soups and sauces, add it to mayonnaise to make a sandwich spread, and use it together with siracha to make delicious deviled eggs.

    The best part is that it keeps in your fridge for at least three months (This is the longest I have ever kept it before eating it all so it probably lasts longer). After a month or so I pour a little olive oil over the top to keep it from browning, but even if you don’t do this you can just skim off the brown part and everything beneath is still wonderful.

    I used Jessica’s recipe for my base which can be found here for anyone interested (http://www.deliciousobsessions.com/2012/12/52-weeks-of-bad-a-bacteria-week-35-fermented-thai-basil-pesto-recipe/)
    Peace y’all. Never stop thinking and living kindly!!

    Adam O. Kirwan

  3. Thanks Rick. No dumb questions in the fermenting world. 1 and 1/2. I’ve updated the recipe so the formatting of that is more clear.

    Best of luck and let us know how it goes.

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